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Thursday 28, Oct 2010

  Potential treatment option for osteonecrosis discovered

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Potential treatment for osteonecrosis identifiedResearchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have been able to identify a potential treatment for the death of bone tissue or osteonecrosis.

The health complication is noticed among people administered with steroids to treat different medical conditions; there is no treatment option, at present, to provide relief to patients afflicted with this complication.

The research was published in the April 27 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Friday 20, Aug 2010

  Potential bone death treatment in the hip from osteonecrosis

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Potential bone death treatment in the hip from osteonecrosisA potential treatment for the death of bone tissue or osteonecrosis has been identified by researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

This complication is seen in people administered with steroids for varying medical conditions and there is no treatment option at present to deal with this debilitating disease.

The research was published in the April 27 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Monday 24, May 2010

  Use of stem cells for modeling birth defects among infants

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Use of stem cells for modeling birth defects among infantsStrawberry-like birthmarks that commonly develop in early infancy, Hemangiomas, are considered harmless but researchers at Children’s Hospital Boston recently discovered that up to ten percent of Hemangiomas cause tissue distortion or destruction and sometimes vision obstruction.

In the March 18 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers showed that steroids target hemangioma stem cells specifically, revealed the action mechanism, and suggested other available ways for halting and shrinking hemangiomas.

Children’s plastic surgeon John Mulliken, MD, co-director of Children’s Vascular Anomalies Center and a co-author on the study, said that his dream was always to give a drug for stopping hemangioma at its first appearance.

Wednesday 21, Apr 2010

  Protein may guard new blood vessels from leakage

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Protein may guard new blood vessels from leakageA protein, known as angiopoietin-1 or Ang1, was recently found to increase growth of blood vessels now appears to guard the vessels from leakage as well, which can be seen as a potential boon in treating chronic inflammatory diseases and for new therapies that help in growth of healthy blood vessels in damaged heart and limbs.

It was disclosed that the protein may restore the leaky vessels to normal and blocks the effects of substances turning the vessels leaky besides complementing the action of another natural blood vessel growth stimulant known as VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor).

The new findings, based on studies of blood vessels in the skin of mice, were reported by researchers at UC San Francisco and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals in the December 24 issue of Science.

Saturday 06, Mar 2010

  Protein behind Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Polyps identified

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Protein behind Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Polyps identifiedVascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein necessary for normal blood vessel growth and stimulating blood vessel growth, has been found to be behind cell overgrowth in the development of polyps characterizing one of the most severe forms of sinusitis.

The finding was revealed by researchers at the Johns Hopkins and appeared in an issue of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Jean Kim, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor in the Departments of Otolaryngology and Allergy and Clinical Immunology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Allergy and Asthma Center at the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, said that this kind of sinusitis isn’t subtle.

Wednesday 16, Dec 2009

  Protein responsible for chronic rhinosinusitis with polyps tracked down

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Protein responsible for chronic rhinosinusitis with polyps tracked downResearchers from the Johns Hopkins have suggested during a study that a protein, vascular endothelial growth factor, or VEGF, a protein important for normal blood vessel growth, is responsible for overgrowth of cells in development of polyps characterizing one of the most severe forms of sinusitis.

This finding by Johns Hopkins researchers is expected to give a new target for development of new therapies for treating this disease form, which usually resist all present forms of treatment.

The findings were published in the Dec. 1 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and suggested that doctors can treat sinusitis in patients with polyps by making use of therapies that minimize VEGF in sinus tissues.

Tuesday 01, Dec 2009

  Novel therapy development for chronic sinusitis may be promoted by a new target

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Novel therapy development for chronic sinusitis may be promoted by a new targetAccording to researchers at the Johns Hopkins, a protein that is known to stimulate growth of blood vessel is responsible for the cell overgrowth in polyps’ development signifying one of the most severe forms of sinusitis.

It is considered by many scientists that this result finding will be more than helpful when it comes to developing novel therapies to treat this disease form that typically resists all current treatments.

The findings suggest that medical practitioners could treat sinusitis in patients with polyps by making use of therapies that minimize VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in sinus tissues.