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Tuesday 20, Jun 2017

  EWF President Attacks IWF Leadership After IOC Warning

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Antonio Urso, the President of the European Weightlifting Federation (EWF), has criticized those in charge of the sport after the International Olympic Committee (IOC) gave a December deadline to address “massive” doping problems.

The IOC’s Executive Board in Lausanne last Friday cut a total of 64 weightlifting quotas from the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. A men’s weight category, which still has to be decided, will also have to be removed following the recommendation by executive board of the IOC. In the last few months, a total of 49 weightlifters have been caught for doping in the retesting of samples from the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games in Beijing and London, respectively.

The IWF is likely to be omitted from the sports program for the 2024 Olympic Games if it fails to satisfy the IOC that improvements have been made by the December deadline.

Urso, who stood unsuccessfully to replace Tamás Aján as the President of IWF at an Electoral Congress in Bangkok late last month, criticized the way the sport of weightlifting has been operated in recent years.

Urso wrote in a letter, published on the EWF website, in which he said the IOC has presented the IWF with a bill, in a timely, surgical and drastic manner, but it will be the entire weightlifting world who will suffer the consequences, not just Aján and those who re-elected him. Urso also commented that a tough, drastic response and there is no going back and also said a curious follow up to the election of a person who has always boasted that weightlifting is in a strong position and not in any danger.

      The President of the European Weightlifting Federation also said it is definitely the worst start for a new four-year Olympic cycle, regardless of who is at the helm of the International Federation. Urso also said there is however no need for dissection or sarcasm, nor for exceptional political skills to observe that this is by no means great acknowledgement for the work done, apparently not so impeccably, in terms of development in favor of this sport, by the re-elected President.

The EWF President also said he must admit that this news from the IOC has left me utterly saddened, because if certain people had been a little more farsighted and a lot less thirsty for power, today we would be talking about something different. Urso also remarked this sport obviously needs to be completely reset in order to start over again with new rules and, more importantly, new people.

In a conciliatory statement, the IWF promised that a “high level task force” will recommend the different measures and initiatives to accomplish the due goals. The statement reads the Olympic Movement and weightlifting was indeed shocked by the result of the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games reanalysis and we recognize our responsibility as governing body of the Olympic sport of weightlifting. The statement also reads that the Executive Board is this time again ready to adopt immediate actions and sanctions stating that the IWF has always been fighting with determination against doping and those willing to affect the integrity of weightlifting sport. It was further said that the IWF, recognizing that there is always way for improvement, aims to strengthen the collaboration between the IOC, NOCs, and Member Federations that is vital for an effective common fight and prevent such situations.

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Tuesday 30, May 2017

  Amendments To Anti-Doping Policy Announced By IWF

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The International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) has announced a new and tougher anti-doping plan. The new policy, agreed in April and ratified recently, becomes effective from June 15.

The sport’s new anti-doping policy allows the IWF to damage future prospects of countries if their weightlifters who have been disqualified from podium positions at the 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games for testing positive fail to return the medals. This policy also allows the International Weightlifting Federation’s (IWF) Executive Board to sanction nations whose athletes repeatedly fail to comply with whereabouts requirements of the IWF.

Few days back, the IWF revealed a new method of reporting suspected cheating on its website. The 2008 and 2012 Olympic Games were recently retested and 49 weightlifters were caught cheating.  Of those who tested positive, 30 were medalists – 11 women and five men in Beijing, plus 10 women, and four men from London.

The International Weightlifting Federation had made three significant announcements in the days leading up to the elections for President and a range of other decision-making roles. A new three-year broadcasting deal was announced with Lagardere that will help with “a reimagining” of the grand prix series and televise the next three IWF World Championships.

Tamás Aján was recently re-elected for a fifth term as President of the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) after he defeated his main rival Antonio Urso in the vote. Aján won by 86 votes to 61; he had also won 80-55 against the Italian in the 2013 election. In 1971, the 78-year-old Hungarian was first elected to the IWF’s Executive Board and became general secretary in 1976 and then President in 2000. Aján will have been at the IWF for more than half-a-century when his latest four-year term ends in 2021.

Aján has pledged to establish women’s weightlifting in all member nations. Aján is an honorary member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and a Foundation Board member of the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Aján said before the vote that the most important fact is that weightlifting has not only remained on the Olympic program but has reconfirmed its permanent and respected status in the Summer Olympic Games. Aján also had remarked that our relations with the IOC are close and mutually constructive.

Aján provided a buoyant update on IWF affairs, and especially finances, before the vote to the delegates. The IWF has $37.5 million (£29 million/€34 million) in reserve, a record level that puts it in “a very strong financial position” and is $14 million (£11 million/€12.5 million) higher than the target set in 2012. Aján had also added that there had been progress in the past four years in every area of activities – in organization, management, governance, sports-specific control and supervision, financial management, communication, marketing, anti-doping, continental federation relations, member federation relations, education, development, and gender equality.

Ursula Papandrea was elected as the IWF’s first female vice-president. Sam Coffa lost his place as a vice-president. Coffa had been an administrator in the sport for 59 years.

China’s Ma Wenguang, another Urso supporter, was defeated in the voting for general secretary by Mohammed Jaloud of Iraq. The first vice-president is Thailand’s Maj Gen Intarat Yodbangtoey, who was unopposed.

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Tuesday 16, May 2017

  Fundamental Changes Required In Sport, Says EWF President

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The highest-ranking weightlifting administrator of Europe has remarked the sport is required to make fundamental changes to its culture, its rules and the way competitions are presented.

Antonio Urso, President of the European Weightlifting Federation (EWF), told member nations at their Congress that we need a new way and direction. The EWF President recounted his embarrassment at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro when he heard spectators laughing about the seemingly endless stream of doping cases that have sent weightlifting to an all-time low in terms of public opinion.

The Italian said he was at one of the medal ceremonies and he could clearly hear the people behind him who said those medals will be in different hands in a few years. Urso added we are losing credibility as a sport.

The spectators were reacting to results of the retesting of samples from the Olympic Games at Beijing 2008 and London 2012 by the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC). The sport of weightlifting accounted for nearly half of all retrospective positives with 30 athletes stripped of their medals and 48 cheats caught. Of the 48 positive tests, 42 were from former Soviet Bloc countries. Seven lifters tested positive including all three medalists in the notorious 2012 men’s 94 kilograms competition. Tomasz Zielinski of Poland was promoted from ninth place to bronze medal position but was sent home from Rio 2016 for a doping offence.

Speaking a day before the European Junior and Under-23 Championships, Urso said 2016 has been the worst year ever for our sport, but he is not surprised. The President of the European Weightlifting Federation also commented he three editorials in the European Federation magazine in 2008, 2009, and 2010 and underlined that some of the results were not human results, that some women were becoming a man, that doping was beyond control. Urso also said some people attacked him unfortunately and said he was destroying weightlifting but today those people can see all too clearly what everybody else can see that doping is destroying us. Urso went on to comment that weightlifting will be nothing if we lose our place in the Olympic Games. The Italian also said the National Federations should accept “a new vision” for the sport.

Urso believes the biggest need for change is in the culture of coaching and in holding coaches responsible, and punishing them, for doping by their athletes. The EWF President said the coach has the highest responsibility in matters of doping, and yet you can have someone as head coach of a national team who was banned for life as a lifter for doping and added this is unacceptable.

Urso will stand for Presidency of the International Weightlifting Federation (IWF) next May against Tamas Ajan and two or three other candidates. Ajan has been President since 2000 and was secretary general of the IWF for 25 years. Urso said he has full respect for the IWF and the rules but we need a new way, a new direction and commented that we are running fast into the future of the sport. Urso also said the organization and presentation is really old and it is up to the National Federations at the election in May whether to stay the same or go for a new vision.

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Sunday 27, Nov 2016

  Kazakh Weightlifting Federation’s Chief Coach Steps Down After Doping Scandal

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Alexei Ni, the chief coach of the Kazakh weightlifting federation, has stepped down from his position after the doping scandal that recently engulfed the sport. Ni helmed the national weightlifting team of Kazakhstan for over 20 years since 1994. Kazakh weightlifters participated in six Olympics Games under his guidance.

The International Olympic Committee stripped weightlifter Ilya Ilyin of Kazakhstan of two gold medals — one each from the Beijing and London Games, both in the 94-kilogram class. Ilyin is believed to be the first summer Olympic athlete to lose two gold medals for doping. Szymon Kolecki of Poland is likely to get Ilyin’s weightlifting gold from Beijing while Saeid Mohammedpour of Iran could take Ilyin’s 2012 gold.

Three Olympic gold medals and one silver medal were stripped of their medals in the latest round of positive doping retests from the 2008 and 2012 Summer Games. The IOC announced seven athletes from Belarus, Azerbaijan, and Kazakhstan were retroactively disqualified after they tested positive for steroids in a reanalysis of their stored doping samples.

Ilyin’s sanction was announced recently by the Kazakhstan Olympic Committee. In a statement, the IOC said Ilya Ilyin tested positive for Stanozolol on his Beijing sample and for Stanozolol and Turinabol in his London test. One of the biggest names in weightlifting, Ilyin said he was “shaken” and “in shock” at the news. Ilyin, the only athlete to win two Olympic gold medals for Kazakhstan, said he was considering an appeal.

The weightlifting program of Kazakhstan, which had been one of the world’s most successful programs over the last decade, has been almost wiped out by retesting of samples,

The IOC also announced Oksana Menkova of Belarus was stripped of the Beijing gold medal in the women’s hammer throw after her retested samples came back positive for Turinabol and Oxandrolone. Menkova was also disqualified from the London Games, where she finished seventh after testing positive for Turinabol and Stanozolol.  The hammer gold medal of Menkova could now be awarded to Yipsi Moreno of Cuba, with Zhang Wenxiu of China in line to be upgraded to silver and Darya Pchelnik of Belarus to bronze.

The World Olympic body also announced Natalia Mikhnevich of Belarus was stripped of the silver medal in the women’s shot put from Beijing after her samples were reanalyzed and tested positive for Methandienone and Stanozolol. Natalia now faces a life ban for a second doping offense as served a two-year doping ban in 2013-15. Her husband, Andrei, is already serving a life ban after he lost his 2008 bronze medal when he was caught for doping in retests of samples from the 2005 world championships.

The IOC announced sanctions on Pavel Lyzhyn of Belarus, fourth-place finisher in the men’s shot put in Beijing, and Svetlana Usovich of Belarus, eliminated in the semifinals of the women’s 800 meters in Beijing. The International Olympic Committee also sanctioned Boyanka Kostova of Azerbaijan, fifth place in the women’s 58-kg weightlifting division in London, and Anastasia Mironchuk-Ivanova of Belarus, seventh in the women’s long jump in London.

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Thursday 28, Apr 2016

  Anti-Doping Reforms Announced By Russia In Bid To Avoid Olympics Ban

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Russia has announced reforms in hopes that they will repair the credibility of its anti-doping body and allow its athletics team to compete at the Rio Olympics.

Last November, Russia was suspended by the International Association of Athletics Federation after the country was accused of “state-sponsored” doping in a report commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency. The Russian ministry of sport announced on Wednesday that all Russian track and field athletes who intend to compete at the Rio Olympics in August will now undergo a minimum of three independent, externally administered anti-doping controls before the Olympics. The Russian sports ministry said these anti-doping controls will be carried out by the world governing body of athletics and be in addition to existing anti-doping procedures.

The ministry of sport also remarked two independent international experts who will be nominated by the World Anti-Doping Agency will be based full-time in Moscow from the end of April. These experts will have complete and free” access for as long as necessary to ensure the Russian anti-doping system is free of undue interference and is fully independent. Russia’s minister of sport, Vitaly Mutko, remarked we believe that sport must be clean and fair at all levels, from grassroots through to elite and added we are 100% supportive of WADA’s efforts, alongside the International Olympic Committee and the IAAF and other organizations, to stamp out cheating. Mutko also commented that the dreams of clean athletes must not be allowed to be destroyed because of other people’s mistakes and also said this is an important step in our journey.

Recently, the head of European Athletics says after meeting Russian officials that the Russian team could still compete at the European Championships if reinstated by the IAAF. European Athletics President Svein Arne Hansen, who is on the IAAF Council that should decide the status of Russia on June 17 in Vienna, said there is still time enough for the Russian team to enter. The IAAF will hear reports from its taskforce into the anti-doping progress made by Russia on June 17.A five-strong IAAF taskforce, headed by former World Anti-Doping Agency director Rune Andersen, has been monitoring Russia’s anti-doping progress. The IAAF said in a statement the taskforce is having regular meetings and conference calls with the ROC (Russian Olympic Committee), the ICC (the Interim Coordination Committee that is coordinating Russia’s co-operation with the taskforce) and the RusAf (the Russian Athletics Federation) and will deliver their next report to the IAAF Council when they meet in June.

In another development, the World Anti-Doping Agency disclosed on April 27 that track and field was the sport with the worst doping record in 2014 and Russia had more doping violations than any other country that year. WADA said Russian athletes racked up a total of 148 violations, followed by Italy with 123, India with 96, and Belgium and France with 91 violations each. Track and field led the number of doping violations by sport with 248, followed by bodybuilding with 225, cycling with 168, weightlifting with 143, and powerlifting with 116.

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Tuesday 09, Dec 2014

  Six-Year Anti-Doping Ban For Weightlifting Coach

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Six-Year Anti-Doping Ban For Weightlifting Coach

New Zealand Sports Tribunal has suspended Daniel Milne, a weightlifting coach, from all sport for six years after he admitted to charges of trafficking and possession of prohibited substances.

In what is the first anti-doping violation of attempted trafficking in New Zealand, Milne admitted both charges before the Sports Tribunal.  The ban imposed on Milne means he will not be allowed to be involved in any form of sport for the six years of his ban, either as a competitor, coach, or trainer.

The lengthy ban was applauded by Drug Free Sport New Zealand chief executive Graeme Steel who said it served as a warning to coaches who encourage or assist with doping. Steel remarked coaches are there to support and inspire athletes, not to drag them into the mire of cheating through drug use and it is unacceptable for a coach to compromise an athlete’s integrity, health and sporting career in this way and he is pleased the tribunal has recognized this by delivering a tough sanction. Steel said courage of the young weightlifter in coming forward to report Milne was admirable.

The Drug Free Sport New Zealand chief executive also said it takes enormous strength of character to come forward to report someone in a position of authority, such as a coach and added this young athlete is to be commended for his bravery and in his view he is a role model for clean sport. Steel also remarked he hopes other athletes will be inspired by his conviction to do the right thing and out someone involved in doping.

Milne offered to supply anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing prohibited substances to a 19-year-old weightlifter in a December 2012 party. Milne was coaching the weightlifter and this “offer” was to help him improve his competitive performance. The Tribunal, in its judgment, said Milne held a party at his house where he showed the weightlifter some products, offered to source them for him and showed him how to use them. Milne’s offer was declined by the young weightlifter and he communicated about this to another coach and this is how the Drug Free Sport New Zealand carried out investigations and referred the matter to the tribunal.

Initially, Milne denied the allegations but then admitted to two anti-doping rule violations, namely possessing and attempted trafficking (selling, giving, delivering, or distributing) a prohibited substances. It was noted by the Tribunal that there were aggravating factors including that the violations happened within an athlete and coach relationship and noted that the weightlifter was a young man who should have received mentoring and support from Milne, and this was not a one-off spontaneous mistake but reflected Milne’s unacceptable attitude towards use of prohibited substances.

The Tribunal added Milne was ashamed and contrite and had made positive contributions to the sport. The tribunal stated that the fundamental attack on the integrity of all sporting contests demands that the breach is not minimized. The tribunal also noted that Milne made positive and constructive contributions to the sport over the years but regrettably a period occurred where he lost focus and sound judgement. It also added he was still a relatively young man with some personal difficulties but still with clear potential.

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Sunday 21, Oct 2012

  Weightlifting Athlete Fernando Reis Accepts Sanction

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Weightlifting athlete fernando reis accepts sanction

Fernando Reis of Saint Charles, Missouri, an athlete in the sport of weightlifting, has tested positive for a prohibited substance, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 21-year-old Reis accepted a suspension for his doping offense after testing positive for methylhexaneamine, a stimulant, as a result of a sample collected at the 2011 National Collegiate Championships, on April 10, 2011, in Shreveport, Louisiana. Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the rules of the International Weightlifting Federation, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List, stimulants are prohibited. Methylhexaneamine is classified as a Specified Substance and its presence in the sample of an athlete can result in a reduced sanction.

A six-month period of ineligibility was accepted by Reis that began on April 24, 2011. Reis is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to April 10, 2011, the day his sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the sanction.

Born on 10 March 1990 in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Fernando Saraiva Reis competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics in the +105 kg event and won a gold medal at the 2011 Pan American Games and a silver medal at the 2010 South American Games in the same weight category. Reis lifted 225Kg in the men’s 105Kg snatch competition during the XVI Pan-American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico, on October 27, 2011 to won a gold medal. In the 2010 USA Weightlifting National Collegiate Championships, Reis (St. Charles, Mo. / Lindenwood University) led after the snatch with his lift of 168kg and jerked 202kg with a lead of 13kg onCollin Ito (Marquette, Mich. / Northern Michigan University). The total of Reis 370kg was 18kg more than Ito who totaled 352kg to win the silver medal. He won a bronze in the Snatch at the 2010 Jr. Worlds held in Sofia, Bulgaria

At the 2011 Pan American Games, Olympic weightlifter Fernando Reis won the gold medal, a first for his home country with a top individual lift of 225kg. He finished 17kg ahead of silver medalist Jose Morales Yoel from Venezuela and bronze medalist George Kobaladze from Canada to earn the top award. Reis captured his second straight National Collegiate Championships in 2011 with a 10kg competition PR, and in the process he broke the American Collegiate total record by 15kgs. He went on a diet heavy in recent months of fattening to gain 30 pounds in a year and a half. Reis reached 132 kg in 2011, 38 more than in 2007 at the Pan American Games in Rio and led the competition from the start and finished with a total and 410 kg, 393 kg runner up. The 2012 Pan American +105kg Champion Fernando Reis earned his ticket to London 2012 with a 180kg Snatch and 230kg C&J. Reis failed a lift in the men’s +105kg Group B snatch weightlifting competition at the ExCel venue during the London 2012 Olympic Games August 7, 2012.


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Saturday 22, Sep 2012

  Weightlifter Patrick Mendes Banned

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Weightlifter Patrick Mendes Banned

The United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) has banned Olympic weightlifter Patrick Mendes after he tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH), a banned substance.

The weightlifter from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” in Las Vegas, Nevada failed anti-doping controls on February 7 and February 27, 2012 prior to the 2012 United States Olympic Team Trials for Weightlifting that determine who would represent the United States at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Patrick Mendes was the top-ranked U.S. Olympic weightlifter at over 105 kilograms.

Mendes was the protégé of renowned weightlifting coach John Broz who lived and trained during his competitive career with legendary Bulgarian superheavyweight Antonio Krastev, who recorded a world record snatch of 216 kilograms in 1987.

The 21-year-old Mendes who was a U.S. Olympic hopeful in weightlifting tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH). The prospective medal favorite in the super heavyweight division at the London Olympics confessed to using the drug after testing positive in two tests administered in February, according to the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) in a statement.

Graduated from Del Sol High in Las Vegas, Patrick Mendes accepted a two-year ban, which commenced on March 19. His positive test results for HGH were the result of two separate samples collected on February 7, 2012, and February 27, 2012 as part of USADA’s Out of Competition Testing Program. The samples of Mendes were tested at the WADA-accredited Sports Medicine Research & Testing Laboratory (SMRTL), located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Human Growth Hormone is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

The weightlifter admitted his use of HGH and accepted a period of two years of ineligibility that began on March 19, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension. As a result of the sanction, Mendes is also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on or subsequent to February 7, 2012, the date the first blood sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes.

USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart said the case demonstrates yet again that the human growth hormone testing works to stop this dangerous drug from being used in sport and added that the agency is pleased that Mendes chose to admit his use of HGH and accept the sanction.

With this suspension, the weightlifter become only the second U.S. athlete found using human growth hormone, the first being minor-league baseball player Mike Jacobs, who tested positive under the program instituted by Major League Baseball last summer.

In another development, 19-year-old Olympic weightlifter Joshua Gilbert of Las Vegas, Nev. from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” tested positive for the diuretic furosemide at the 2012 National Weightlifting Championships that was held in conjunction with the U.S. Olympic Trials as part of the Arnold Sports Festival in Columbus (Ohio) on March 2, 2012. Joshua Gilbert was suspended for a period of three years for his anti-doping rule violation by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).


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Friday 21, Sep 2012

  Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

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Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

Olympic weightlifter Joshua Gilbert of Las Vegas, Nev., an athlete in the sport of weightlifting, accepted a suspension of three years from the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) for his anti-doping rule violation.

The 19-year-old tested positive for Furosemide on March 2, 2012 at the National Championships, and refused to submit to doping control on March 20, 2012. Since Gilbert had not yet been notified of the results of the March 2nd test prior to his refusal to submit, under the rules both incidents are classified as one anti-doping rule violation. Both the incidents are prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code.

Gilbert was banned from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” (Las Vegas, Nevada) after he tested positive for a banned substance.

Aggravating circumstances justify a period of ineligibility greater than the standard sanction, and as such the weightlifter received a three-year period of ineligibility for his anti-doping rule violation which began on April 5, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension in accordance with the WADA Code.

Joshua Gilbert s also disqualified from all competitive results obtained on or subsequent to, March 2, 2012, the date his sample was collected, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes. Gilbert, a promising Olympic lifter who trained under John Broz, tested positive for diuretic furosemide at the 2012 National Weightlifting Championships that was held in conjunction with the U.S. Olympic Trials as part of the Arnold Sports Festival in Columbus (Ohio) on March 2, 2012. Broz lived and trained with legendary Bulgarian superheavyweight Antonio Krastev, who recorded a world record snatch of 216 kilograms in 1987, during his career.

Furosemide is listed as a masking agent because of its potential to assist in elimination of anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing drugs from the body besides helping athletes to make weight in sports with multiple weight classes like weightlifting, boxing, and wrestling.

In another development, Patrick Mendes also from “Average Broz’s Gymnasium” tested positive for human growth hormone and was suspended for a period of two years. The 21-year-old tested positive for Human Growth Hormone (HGH) as the result of two separate samples collected on February 7, 2012, and February 27, 2012 as part of USADA’s Out of Competition Testing Program. The samples were tested at the WADA-accredited Sports Medicine Research & Testing Laboratory (SMRTL), located in Salt Lake City, Utah. HGH is prohibited under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Weightlifting Federation (“IWF”) Anti-Doping Policies, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code. He accepted a two-year period of ineligibility, which began on March 19, 2012, the day he accepted a provisional suspension.

A U.S. Olympic hopeful in weightlifting, Mendes, tested positive for human growth hormone (HGH). Mendes, who graduated from Del Sol High in Las Vegas, accepted a two-year ban, which commenced on March 19. Mendes became the second U.S. athlete found using HGH after minor-league baseball player Mike Jacobs, who tested positive under the program instituted by Major League Baseball last summer.

Olympic Weightlifter Joshua Gilbert Banned

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Thursday 24, May 2012

  Doping scandal of India gets murkier

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School children from the Indian states of Punjab and Maharashtra have recently been found leading the list of doping offenders in the country.

Eleven children – from boxing, wrestling and weightlifting – tested positive for anabolic steroids and diuretics during the 57th National School Games as per the National Anti-Doping Agency.

“This has become a very serious matter. That 14 per cent of the samples have returned positive is a matter of shame for the schools and officials. It is much higher than the national average of 4 per cent,” NADA director general Rahul Bhatnagar told TOI.

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