Bradley Wiggins, the first British man to win the Tour de France, is facing a fight for his reputation after recently-leaked documents showed he used banned performance enhancing drugs.

Wiggins used Triamcinolone, the same drug Lance Armstrong tested positive for at the 1999 Tour de France.

Wiggins has been forced to deny that the controversial Belgian doctor Geert Leinders was involved in his obtaining so-called therapeutic use exemptions. This was after details of the therapeutic use exemptions granted to him and fellow Tour de France winner, Chris Froome, were leaked.

The leaked documents suggested three TUEs were obtained by Bradley Wiggins for the treatment of asthma and allergies between 2011 and 2013, each before his major target race for that season. The British cyclist also had to clarify apparent inconsistencies between what he wrote in 2012 about the use of needles and the details that have emerged via the Fancy Bears hackers.

In a statement, a spokesperson for Wiggins said Brad has no direct link to Geert Leinders. The spokesperson added Leinders was ‘on race’ doctor for Team Sky for short period and so was occasionally present at races dealing with injuries sustained whilst racing such as colds, bruises etc. It was further commented by the spokesperson of Wiggins that Leinders had no part in Brad’s TUE application and added Brad’s medical assessments from 2011-2015 were processed by the official Team Sky doctor, and were verified by independent specialists to follow WADA, UCI, and BC guidelines. The statement also reads Brad’s passing comment regarding needles in the 2012 book referred to the historic and illegal practice of intravenous injections of performance-enhancing substances, which was the subject of a law change by [world cycling’s governing body] the UCI in 2011. It was also commented that the Triamcinolone injection that is referred to in the Wada leaks is an intramuscular treatment for asthma and is fully approved by the sport’s governing bodies and Brad stands by his comment concerning the use of illegal intravenous needle injections.

Belgian doctor Geert Leinders was a Team Sky doctor between 2011-2012 and Bradley won the Tour de France in the latter year. Leinders was later banned for life for doping offences committed during a previous stint at the tainted Rabobank cycling team between 2001-2009.

David Walsh, the Sunday Times journalist who brought down Lance Armstrong, suggested that a 2012 injection of Triamcinolone was given as a preventive measure rather than to treat existing symptoms ahead of Wiggins’s historic Tour victory. The journalist said the team that wanted to be seen as whiter than white had been dealing in shades of grey and added what they did was legal, but it was not right.

The British professional road and track racing cyclist, who rides for the UCI Continental team WIGGINS and was awarded a CBE in 2009, won the Paris–Nice, the Tour de Romandie, the Critérium du Dauphiné, and became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France and the time trial at the Olympic Games in 2012.

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