WADA Will Not Appeal Against Tyson Gay’s Lenient Doping Ban

The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has remarked that it will not appeal against the “too lenient” doping ban imposed on American sprinter Tyson Gay by the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA).

The 31-year-old Gay tested positive for the presence of an exogenous androgenic anabolic steroid and/or its metabolites which was confirmed by CIR (GC/C/IRMS) analysis, as the result of two out-of-competition and one in-competition urine samples collected by both USADA and the International Association of Athletic Federations (IAAF).

In a statement, WADA said Gay’s ban that had been widely criticized in Europe as extremely lenient was ‘compatible with the World Anti-Doping Code.’ The world’s second fastest man, Tyson Gay, accepted a suspension of one year last month by USADA after a 2013 positive test for an anabolic steroid. USADA backdated the ban to June 23, 2013 to make Gay eligible to make a return to running later this month and Gay’s first race after the ban will be a 100 meters at Lausanne’s Diamond League meeting on July 3.

Gay accepted the doping ban and returned the silver medal he won as a member of the U.S. 4×100 meters relay team at the 2012 London Olympics. The athlete has also been disqualified from all competitive results obtained on and subsequent to July 15, 2012, the date he first made use of a product that contained a prohibited substance, including the forfeiture of all medals, points, and prizes.

USADA CEO Travis T. Tygart had remarked we appreciate Tyson doing the right thing by immediately withdrawing from competition once he was notified, accepting responsibility for his decisions, and fully and truthfully cooperating with us in our ongoing investigation into the circumstances surrounding his case.

Under rules, an athlete receives a suspension of two years for their first major doping offense but this ban may get reduced for ‘substantial cooperation’ under anti-doping rules. USADA remarked that Tyson Gay was eligible for a doping ban reduction as he offered what it termed substantial assistance in his case and WADA said it was satisfied with the USADA decision. In a statement, WADA remarked it is satisfied that Tyson Gay provided substantial assistance to USADA in an appropriate fashion after careful review and scrutiny of the full case file.

It added WADA will therefore not appeal USADA’s decision that is compatible with the World Anti-Doping Code. Officials of the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) that also has the right to appeal against the decision declined to make a comment and remarked that the matter remains in the hands of its doping review board to assess. Last month, IAAF president Lamine Diack said he supported the WADA Code rule that permits athletes to receive reduced sentences if they provide substantial assistance to anti-doping agencies.

In an interview at the inaugural IAAF World Relays in the Bahamas, Diack said we have to use this in the fight against doping. He added if someone gave really very good cooperation and gives us the possibility to do more to fight doping, we have to do something.

Gay is keen to make a return and remarked Lausanne has always been one of his favorite meets, and added he is thrilled to have it be his opening meet.

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