brain_steroidsIf athletes have their performance-enhancing drugs, the office workers and students have their brain-enhancing drugs or the so-called brain steroids.

Yes, there are now such things as brain-enhancing drugs which are used by regular white-collar employees can work harder, longer, and better. They are also used by students to perform better in their academics. These are substances normally indicated for narcolepsy and ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder).

Users of brain steroids have two informal classifications of these substances – sleep-replacement compounds and focus drugs.

Caffeine and Provigil (modafinil), a drug used to treat narcolepsy, belong to the first group. Provigil was purposely developed to promote wakefulness in patients with sleep disorders.

Ritalin (methylphenidate), Adderall and Focalin are of the second group, which reportedly improves cognitive functions such as focus and memory.

Ritalin and Adderall are particularly popular among today’s students. And because of the rampant usage of these drugs, many steroids users – anabolic steroids users, to be more precise – question how it is different than the use of AAS in the athletics.

If the federal authorities are cracking down on amateur and pro level athletes who are using anabolic steroids, why not do the same to the pill-popping student populace? Is there really a big difference between a student using drugs to get better grades and an athlete using the same (well, basically the same) to get better points?

Brain steroids users, like their counterparts in the sporting field, also adapt self-experimentation when it comes to dosage protocols. Since the Food and Drug Administration is unlikely to approve these drugs other than for their clinical applications, brain steroids users will be on that self-experimentation stage for a while.

Although anabolic steroids use is not criminalized, selling or possessing them with intent to distribute is considered a criminal act under the federal law. Violations can mean fines or imprisonment.

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