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Thursday 29, Sep 2016

  UKAD And JADA Share Best Practice In Preparation

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UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) hosted the Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA), Japan Sports Council, and Japan Sports Agency, from 19 to 21 September to share best practice and knowledge ahead of the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

JADA, with memories of the England 2015 Rugby World Cup and the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Rio still fresh in mind, has started its preparations of providing a comprehensive testing and anti-doping education program at each of the events in the next three or four years.

UK Anti-Doping and the Japan Anti-Doping Agency signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) at the beginning of 2015 that set out a count of objectives aimed towards protecting clean sport and clean athletes both at home and abroad. UK Anti-Doping has successfully delivered a range of contracted anti-doping services to major sporting events in the UK, from Olympic, Paralympic and Commonwealth Games to major championships and World Cups across a range of sports. A wide variety of topics, including education, testing, communications, intelligence gathering and results management at recent events were presented and discussed at length with a number of vital learning achieved throughout the course of the three-day visit of JADA officials.

UKAD’s Director of Business Services, Philip Bunt said it was a pleasure to welcome our colleagues from Japan and provide vital assistance in preparation for their hosting of the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Bunt added UK Anti-Doping has a wealth of experience when it comes to providing anti-doping programs at major sporting events and added we are fully committed to working alongside our international partners in order to benefit clean athletes by enhancing global anti-doping programs and major sporting events are a critical part of that strategy.

UK Anti-Doping interim Chief Executive, Nicole Sapstead, and the President of JADA, Professor Hidenori Sukuzi, both signed the MOU on 28 January 2015 that will run until 2020. The signing took place at The Second International Conference on The Pharmaceutical Industry and the Fight against Doping: New Developments for Clean Sport and Society held in Tokyo.

Nicole had remarked UKAD is fully committed to working together with its international partners to enhance anti-doping programs globally for the benefit of clean athletes and had also remarked that we will also be working with them to develop their educational program so that the next generation of Japanese sports men and women are instilled with the values of clean sport from a very young age.

Professor Hidenori Suzuki, President of JADA, had then remarked JADA is very much looking forward to working with UKAD over the next five years. Hidenori added we want the major sporting events being held in Japan to be the best they can be and further commented that UKAD has accumulated extensive experience in terms of best practice in anti-doping after the 2012 Games and we want to build on this knowledge base to ensure the events we will be hosting are the cleanest they can be. The President of JADA had further remarked that we want to create a legacy for the next generation where they are aware and practice the values of clean sport and integrity of sport.

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Sunday 28, Aug 2016

  Campaign To Discredit Whistleblower Ramped Up By Russia

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Moscow is ramping up a campaign against the whistleblower, Dr. Grigory Rodchenkov, the former director of Russia’s anti-doping laboratory, after being enraged by its blanket ban from the Paralympic Games and the exclusion of scores of its athletes from the Olympic Games.

Rodchenkov provided detailed evidence of state-sponsored doping to The New York Times in May. The former Russian anti-doping lab chief described an elaborate scheme by Russia’s intelligence agency, the Federal Security Service (FSB) to tamper with urine samples in midnight during the last Winter Olympics, held in Sochi, Russia. Rodchenkov also revealed he had created a special cocktail for Russian athletes that mixed banned drugs and hard liquor.

Rodchenkov’s claims were confirmed by a two-month inquiry into allegations of Russian doping commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Richard H. McLaren, a Canadian lawyer and the head of the inquiry, called accounts of the Russian true beyond reasonable doubt and cited forensic evidence, computer records, and corroborating witnesses that backed it up.

The world governing body of athletics, the IAAF, then banned the entire Russian track and field team from the Rio Olympics. More than 100 Russian athletes, nearly one-third of the squad, were ultimately barred from competing in the Olympics.

A Moscow court has now ordered the seizure of property belonging to him while hearing a criminal case filed against the doctor. This order is part of a sustained effort by Russian officials and state-run news media to discredit the man who has been reviled in Russia as a traitorous liar serving foreign interests. However, the claims made by Rodchenkov have been determined as accurate by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

A spokesperson for the Basmanny District Court in Moscow remarked an order to confiscate property in Russia owned by Rodchenkov, who now lives in the United States, was issued on August 12, a few days after the ban on Russian Paralympians was first announced and had since been executed on a plot of land.

Russia’s Prime Minister, Dmitry Medvedev, responded to the ban, by saying the story of Russian doping investigations is a thick and disgusting cocktail made up of 20 percent doping and 80 percent politics. Medvedev added these politics are directed against Russian sport, Russian athletes and Russia as a state.

The ban on Russian Paralympians was described by Russian President Vladimir Putin as outside of law, outside of morals and outside of humanity. Putin added it is just cynical to take it out on people for whom sport has become the meaning of life, those who by their example give millions of people with limited capabilities hope and faith in their power. Putin, speaking at a ceremony in the Kremlin to honor Russia’s gold medal winners at the Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, commented that the humanist foundation of sport and Olympism was brazenly violated by politics.

Alexei Martynov, a columnist in the daily Izvestiya, remarked discrimination against Russian athletes recalled Nazi Germany’s policies toward Slavs, Gypsies, Jews, the mentally handicapped, and the physically disabled. Komsomolskaya Pravda, a Russian newspaper, went on to describe the actions taken against athletes of Russia as the second phase of the Cold War that has been declared on Russia.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: Campaign To Discredit Whistleblower Ramped Up By Russia

Sunday 21, Apr 2013

  New Test To Catch Cheating Athletes

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New Test To Catch Cheating Athletes

A new test to catch drug cheats in sport has been developed by scientists from three UK universities.

The GH-2004 team, which is based the University of Southampton, has been developing a test over the last decade for misuse of growth hormone in sport with funding from the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and US Anti-Doping Agency and with support from UK Anti-Doping.

The test, used for the first time by King’s College London analysts at the anti-doping laboratory for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, is developed by scientists at the University of Southampton, King’s College London and University of Kent at Canterbury and based on the measurement of two proteins in the blood, insulin-like growth factor-I and the amino terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen. Both of the proteins, which act as markers of growth hormone use, lead to an increase in response to growth hormone.

On 8 September 2012, the International Paralympic Committee made an announcement that two power-lifters had received two-year suspensions for Anti-Doping Rule Violations involving growth hormone following an adverse laboratory finding using the new markers test.

Richard Holt, Professor in Diabetes and Endocrinology at the University of Southampton and also a consultant in Diabetes at Southampton General Hospital, said we are pleased to have another effective and reliable means to catch cheats and help deter harmful drug misuse. He added there has been a tremendous amount of team work to develop this test and he is delighted that this dedication has finally succeeded. I would like to thank the World Anti-Doping Agency, US Anti-Doping and UK Anti-Doping for their support and trust in our work.

Professor David Cowan, Head of the Drug Control Centre at King’s College London and Director of the anti-doping laboratory for the Games, said these findings prove that the years of research have been worthwhile. Cowan added this has been one of the most complex scientific projects the Drug Control Centre at King’s has been involved in partnership with the University of Southampton and Kent University and to be able to carry out this test at this year’s Games is a huge achievement. He also remarked that it represents a big step forward in staying at the forefront of anti-doping science, to help deter drug misuse in sport.

Andy Parkinson, UK Anti-Doping Chief Executive, adds continual improvement in testing science is fundamental to the global anti-doping movement ensuring that sophisticated dopers are caught and those at a tipping point are deterred. Parkinson said he is delighted that this UK developed test, which his team has been closely involved with, was used at the 2012 Paralympic Games to such good effect.

WADA President John Fahey praised the test by saying the new test – which has been approved by WADA – was first introduced prior to the London 2012 Olympic Games, and we are confident that it will prove a significant tool in the fight against doping in sport. Fahey also remarked that it will complement the test that has been in use since the 2004 Athens Olympic Games, the major difference being that the anti-doping community now has a much longer detection window to work with.

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Saturday 06, Apr 2013

  New Growth Hormone Test And Positive Findings From UK Research

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New Growth Hormone Test And Positive Findings From UK Research

Following ten years of research by the GH-2004 team, based at the University of Southampton, a new test for growth hormone has been developed and implemented.

With funding from the World Anti-Doping Agency and US Anti-Doping Agency, and supported by UK Anti-Doping, this test was used for the first time by King’s College London analysts at the anti-doping laboratory for  the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, leading to two Paralympic findings. It is based on the measurement of two proteins in the blood, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and the amino terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen (P-III-NP). Both the proteins that act as markers of the use of growth hormone lead to an increase in response to GH.

The work of the GH-2004 project built on previous research from the GH-2000 team which was a consortium of leading growth hormone experts from London, Gothenberg, Aarhus, and Naples, in partnership with the two European growth hormone manufacturers (Novo Nordisk and Pharmacia) and statisticians from the University of Kent and was mainly funded by the European Union under their Biomed 2 Program (BMH4 CT950678) and the International Olympic Committee.

Growth hormone, also known as somatotropin or somatropin, is a peptide hormone that stimulates growth, cell reproduction, and regeneration in humans and other animals. GH is used as a prescription drug in medicine to treat children’s growth disorders and adult growth hormone deficiency.

The International Paralympic Committee, on September 8, 2012, made an announcement that two Powerlifters had received two year suspensions for Anti-Doping Rule Violations involving growth hormone following an adverse laboratory finding using the new markers test.

Richard Holt, Professor in Diabetes and Endocrinology at the University of Southampton said we are pleased to have another and more effective and reliable means to catch cheats and help deter harmful drug misuse. Holt added that there has been a tremendous amount of team work to develop this test and he is delighted that this dedication has finally succeeded and thanked the World Anti-Doping Agency, US Anti-Doping, and UK Anti-Doping for their support and trust in the work.

Head of the Drug Control Centre at King’s College London and Director of the anti-doping laboratory for the Games, Professor David Cowan, said these findings prove that the years of research have been worthwhile. He added this has been one of the most complex scientific projects, in partnership with Southampton University and Kent University, the Drug Control Centre at King’s has been involved in and added that to be able to carry out this test at this year’s Games is a huge achievement as it represents a big step forward in staying at the forefront of anti-doping science, to help deter drug misuse in sport.

UK Anti-Doping Chief Executive, Andy Parkinson, remarked continual improvement in testing science is fundamental to the global anti-doping movement, ensuring that sophisticated dopers are caught and those at a tipping point are deterred and expressed his delight that this UK developed test, which his team has been closely involved with, was used at the 2012 Paralympic Games to such good effect.

pdf_iconDownload in PDF: New Growth Hormone Test And Positive Findings From UK Research

Saturday 20, Oct 2012

  Paralympic Track And Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Paralympic track and field athlete accepts sanction

Matthew Brown of Idalou, Texas, an athlete in the sport of Paralympic track and field, has tested positive for a prohibited substance, according to a statement by the United States Anti-doping Agency (USADA).

The 35-year-old accepted a suspension for his doping offense after testing positive for tetrahydrocannabinol acid, a marijuana metabolite in the class of Cannabinoids, in a sample collected on June 17, 2011 at the 2011 U.S. Paralympic Track & Field National Championships in Miramar.

Under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing and the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) anti-doping rules, both of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code and the WADA Prohibited List, cannabinoids are prohibited and listed as Specified Substances as they can be susceptible to a credible non-doping explanation, and therefore use of those substances can result in a reduced sanction. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said in cases involving marijuana there could be a “credible non-doping explanation.”

A three-month period of ineligibility was accepted by Brown that began on July 12, 2011, the day he accepted the sanction. The ineligibility period was suspended and reduced to time served, upon his successful completion of a USADA anti-doping educational program, which he completed on July 14, 2011.

Brown has been disqualified from all competitive results achieved at the 2011 U.S. Paralympic Track & Field Championships, where his sample was collected, through and including the date the doping education program was completed, including forfeiture of any medals, points, and prizes as a result of the doping violation.

The former Wildcats standout and current Wildcats assistant coach earned a spot on the U.S. Paralympic track and field team. Brown finished first in the discus and second in the shot put at the U.S. National Championships in Atlanta. Matthew Brown competes with a prosthetic left leg after a pipeline explosion some years ago severed his leg below the knee while working on a gas well in Fort Worth. Brown returned to Idalou after the accident and the former Class 2A state discus champion soon began working as a volunteer coach for the Wildcats shot put and discus throwers. Matthew Brown quickly became one of the top Paralympic throwers in the country as he showed at the national championships and set North American and South American records in both the discus (143-6) and the shot put (41-9).

Brown won a gold medal in discus and a bronze in the shot put at the 2007 Parapan American Games and finished fourth in the men’s discus F42 when he made his first Paralympic Games appearance in Beijing. Brown played college football for two years and was an All-American in track and field and graduated from Wayland Baptist University (Plainview, Texas) with a degree in education. He was an All-State tight end in football, an All-District center in basketball and a two-time state champion in shot put/discus. Some of his major achievements included 2011 Gold medal in discus (F42), gold in discus at the 2007 Parapan American Games, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and a bronze in shot put at the 2007 Parapan American Games, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Paralympic Track and Field Athlete Accepts Sanction

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Tuesday 04, Sep 2012

  Paralympic Organizers Defend Drug Testing Policy

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After French Paralympic team deputy boss, Rudy Van Abeele, accused Britain of technological doping during the ongoing Paralympic Olympics and the organizers accused of not testing all athletes, Paralympic organizers have defended their decision not to drug test all medal winners saying the greater number of events made it “impossible”. It was said that more than 500 golds are being competed for in the Paralympic Games compared with 300 at the Olympics.

The chief medical officer for the International Paralympic Committee recently warned that the incentive to cheat may increase in these games because of new interest in Games. The International Paralympic Committee would be carrying out 1,250 tests on 4,200 athletes between the opening of the Paralympic village and the closing ceremony. The Committee relies on intelligence-gathering and risk assessment for deciding which sports to focus on most closely, rather than regularly testing a set number of athletes in each event.

Dr. Peter Van de Vliet, IPC Medical & Scientific Director, added that there has been drug-taking in Paralympic power-lifting historically and the event is now listed for stringent spot checks. He added that athletes, over the course of the years, have found that boosting had the potential of increasing their sporting abilities but this could possibly become a life-endangering situation. If an athlete purposefully makes an attempt for introducing the process of autonomic dysreflexia, this would constitute a reason to disqualify.

The team of Van de Vliet is looking out for examples of boosting wherein blood pressure is raised artificially for improving performance. With boosting, a condition called autonomic dysreflexia, which affects quadriplegics, and boosts blood pressure and heart rate is induced and it can be brought on by self-harming deliberately or using tight leg straps.

A few days back, UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) confirmed that the national anti-doping organization has completed its pre-Paralympic prevention program with all team members tested. A number of those participating as guides and competition partners along with the athletes competing were also tested as part of the program. The staff with UK Anti-Doping, responsible for testing British athletes, said they cannot reveal how many athletes have been granted a therapeutic user exemption, citing patient confidentiality. UK Anti-Doping has also been running a 24-hour ‘Clean Conscience’ support line since August 15 for answering any questions that Paralympic athletes have around anti-doping in addition to the online materials available on the UKAD London 2012 microsite.

Recently, Paralympic cyclist Monica Bascio, a 15-time American champion, was suspended for three months after testing positive for tuaminoheptane on May 26 at a Para-Cycling Road World Cup event in Rome after taking an over-the-counter treatment, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said.

Every Paralympics GB athlete had been tested at least once before the Paralympics, said Nicole Sapstead, director of operations at UK Anti-Doping, which is responsible for testing athletes before the Games. It was further remarked that the British Paralympic Association was committed to safeguard fundamental rights of athletes to participate in a drug-free sport and thereby promote health, fairness and equality for athletes competing in Paralympic sport in the UK. All athletes participating in the Paralympic Games are bound by the Prohibited List of Substances and Methods as published by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

 

 

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Saturday 07, May 2011

  Indian Powerlifter suspended

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Indian Powerlifter suspendedPowerlifter Virender Singh from India has been suspended by the International Paralympic Committee for a period of three years.

The suspension happened due to an anti-doping rule violation by Singh and will rule him out of the next Paralympic Games in London in 2012.

“As a signatory of the World Anti-Doping Code (WADC), the IPC remains committed to a doping free sporting environment at all levels,” a spokesperson for the IPC said.

Friday 28, Jan 2011

  Two powerlifters excluded from Paralympic Games

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Two powerlifters excluded from Paralympic GamesFacourou Sissoko from Mali and Ukrainian Liudmyla Osmanova have been excluded from the Paralympic Games following doping violations.

The duo tested positive in pre-Games out-of-competition tests for boldenone metabolite and 19-Norandrosterone (anabolic agents), respectively.

Both Sissoko and Osmanova have been disqualified from the Beijing Games and banned for two years.

Friday 12, Sep 2008

  Somebody’s ‘butt’ got kicked because of steroids

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Nameed Ahmed Butt, a 37-year-old powerlifter who hails from Pakistan tested positive for a banned compound in the ongoing Paralympic Games in Beijing.

The urine sample was taken Sept. 4, two days before the opening ceremony.

“In accordance with the IPC anti-doping code, and after a hearing of the IPC anti-doping committee, the IPC ratified the decision to disqualify Butt from the Beijing 2008 Paralympic Games,” the statement said, adding that a two-year ban had been imposed.

Peter Van de Vliet, the IPC’s medical and scientific director, said Butt’s accreditation was also being canceled.

The IPC has said it plans about 1,000 in- and out-of-competition tests on both blood and urine.

Another Paralympian also was kicked out of Beijing because he tested positive for a masking agent.

Ahmet Coskun, German wheelchair basketballer, was disqualified from the games for using a banned drug. Coskun’s pre-competition urine test on August 23 tested positive for finasteride, a compound used to treat hair loss.

According to the statement released by the German National Paralympic Committee, although finasteride does not enhance performance it can be used to mask or cover up drugs that do. Coskun, meanwhile, denied he had used performance-enhancing drugs.

“I was thinking about my hair and had no idea that the drug, which is against hair loss, contained a banned substance. I’m very upset. I never intended to do doping,” the 33-year-old Coskun stated in said statement.

“We take the issue of anti-doping very seriously. We’ve been carrying out an intensive anti-doping campaign for years in cooperation with NADA (the German anti-doping agency),” German chef de mission Karl Quade said in the same statement.

In 2004 Paralympic Games held in Athens, two powerlifters from Azerbaijan were banned after testing positive for anabolic steroids in out-of-competition screenings.

Urine samples from Gunduz Ismayilov showed traces of stanazolol while Sara Abbasova tested positive for nandrolone. They were the second doping offenses for both athletes as such they received lifetime ban from the sport.

Ismayilov had served a two-year ban after testing positive for methandienone and nandrolone metabolites at the Sydney Paralympics in 2000.

Abbasova’s first offense was at the 2001 European powerlifting championships where she tested positive also for methandienone.

Methandienone is a steroid derived from testosterone that exhibits strong anabolic and moderate androgenic properties. This compound is popular among athletes because it is one of the most effective steroids around. This steroid is known to yield impressive muscle mass and strength in just a short period of time. It derives strength for athletes by readily augmenting depleted glycogen storage. Glycogen is a form of glucose which functions as the primary short term energy storage in human cells.

The incident with the Azerbaijan athletes was the first time the International Paralympic Committee has imposed a lifetime ban.

The Paralympic Games in Beijing commenced September 6 and will run up to September 17. That’s a few more days to go and so other Paralympian might be tested positive for banned compounds. We’ll keep you posted.