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Monday 18, Apr 2011

  Teen steroid testing funds reduced

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Teen steroid testing funds reducedThe suicide of his teenage son led Don Hooton to make way for a foundation that now offers anti-steroid information at high schools and colleges across the U.S. and Canada and accepts annual donations from Major League Baseball and the National Football League for the Taylor Hooton Foundation.

The foundation has been receiving appreciation from different quarters and is serving the purpose of its creation.

Hooton, who runs the foundation out of his McKinney home remarked, “We’re going to budget this down to defeating the purpose of the program.”

Friday 01, Apr 2011

  Funding reduced for steroid program

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Funding reduced for steroid programEnglish textbooks and new science labs for Texas students would be on the chopping block, according to the Texas Education Agency‘s budget reduction plan, requested by Gov. Rick Perry and other state leaders.

The plan will also mean reducing funding for a steroid testing program for high school athletes.

Several proposed textbook purchases have been delayed in recent years to cope with drops in state revenue. That means students have to continue using old and often outdated textbooks for longer than intended.

The proposed cutbacks total approximately $262 million for the 2012-13 budget.

Monday 28, Mar 2011

  State cuts funds for teen steroid testing

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State cuts funds for teen steroid testingThe anti-steroid message by Don Hooton after his teenage son’s suicide, attributed to steroid use, has never been more in demand.

The foundation created by him offers information at high schools and colleges across the U.S. and Canada and accepts annual donations from Major League Baseball and the National Football League for the Taylor Hooton Foundation.

Hooton, who runs the foundation out of his McKinney home says, “We’re going to budget this down to defeating the purpose of the program.”

Saturday 19, Sep 2009

  NFL may transfer control of its steroid testing program to WADA

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NFL may transfer control of its steroid testing program to WADAIf it is determined, that NFL could not run its steroid testing program effectively in cooperation with the player’s union, then it is possible that the league would give control of its steroid -testing program to an outside agency.

It would be a very significant move for the league, considering that it has administered its own testing policy for two decades.

The acknowledgement came after the court rulings on the case of Minnesota Vikings players were released. Courts ruled two issues involving Minnesota workplace laws while rejecting most of the players’ claims.

According to the league’s view, players belonging to different teams are subject to a different set of drug-testing rules depending on which state they play in.

In a telephone interview, Jeff Pash, the league counsel and executive vice president for labor said that their program was fragmented by wide-ranging state laws. If this were the case, then it would be best if they turn to an outside agency such as the World Anti-doping Agency (WADA) to administer their drug-testing program. If there is anything they do not want to do, that is to stop the program because it has been beneficial to everyone.

Thursday 14, May 2009

  Steroid Testing In Texas Will Be Scaled-Down

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Steroid Testing In Texas Will Be Scaled-DownThe past weeks, lawmakers have scrutinized the steroid testing program which has been implemented in Austin, Texas. Because of the huge amount of money used for testing of high school students, both the House and the Senate has proposed to scale-down the program.

The testing program in Texas was initiated two years ago in order to screen high school athletes that administer steroids.

In the steroid testing conducted for school year 2008-2009, only 11 were found positive on steroids against the 29,000 students who were randomly tested.

The final budget for the steroid testing program is still under negotiation. Although, in the next two years, testing program for steroids will possibly focus only on athletes in football, weightlifting, track and field, wrestling and baseball to lessen the cost.

Wednesday 17, Dec 2008

  â€œDiuretic Five” not the first players suspended for StarCaps “doped” supplement

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nfl-steroids1The NFL players who got suspended recently because of tainted StarCaps supplement were not the first “victims” of the weight-loss product as reported by the Tennessean.

According to David Black, a toxicologist of a drug-testing lab in Nashville, a professional player had tested positive for the banned diuretic bumetanide in 2007. Black refused to identify the athlete but he said that athlete had requested Black’s lab to conduct a test on the StarCaps. The result? It tested positive for bumetanide.

“It took us a couple of Ph.Ds and a $300,000 piece of equipment to verify that Bumetanide was contained in StarCaps,” he said. “How is somebody supposed to know buying it off the shelf or off the Internet what it really contains? We spent an enormous amount of resources trying to understand this product.”

Black, who’s been part of the NFL’s original steroid testing program way back in 1980s, said that there are other risks bumetanide offers to athletes aside from testing positive for it and getting banned.

“Bumetanide is a potent diuretic for an athlete or someone in a situation where they might become dehydrated,” he said. “They’d be taking a diuretic without the knowledge of it. That could lead to serious health considerations. That could lead to electrolyte abnormalities, cardiovascular collapse, cardiac arrhythmias, heart attack, stroke and death.”

The World Anti-Doping Agency confirmed that StarCaps contained the banned compound and reported those findings in the Journal of Analytical Toxicology on its Nov-Dec 2007 issue.

Unfortunately, NFL players are not the types who scan scientific journals on their spare time and that’s too bad for the five players who got suspended for violating NFL’s policy on anabolic steroids and related substances.

Kevin Williams and Pat Williams of the Minnesota Vikings and Charles Grant, Deuce McAllister and Will Smith of the New Orleans Saints – collectively known as the “Diuretic Five” –  tested positive for bumetanide during training camp.

The players, however, were allowed to rejoin their teams when a federal judge in St. Paul, Minn. issued a preliminary injunction to block their suspensions.
U.S. District Court Judge Paul Magnuson said he needed more time to rule on the case involving the five players.

The league apparently has known that the StarCaps contained the diuretic but chose not to inform its players